Monsanto Corruption with Federal Judges: Corruption in High Places Barry Kurren’s cozy relationship with Monsanto, and the poisoning of the children of Hawaii.

•December 17, 2014 • Leave a Comment
Corruption in High Places Barry Kurren's cozy relationship with Monsanto, and the poisoning of the children of Hawaii.

Corruption in High Places
Barry Kurren’s cozy relationship with Monsanto, and the poisoning of the children of Hawaii.

Earlier we reported on how Maui, Hawaii, recently passed a ban on genetically modified organisms (GMOs). As a result, Monsanto — the company best known for GMOs — filed a lawsuit against them in hopes of invalidating the recently-passed law, stating it is only up to them to decide what to do with a product that is their own, not the people. Now there is an update to this story, as the judge overseeing the lawsuit might actually be in Monsanto’s back pocket.

Monsanto

Barry Kurren will be the judge who will oversee the lawsuit against Maui, Hawaii, filed by Monsanto. (via U.S. Courts website)

According to an article by Mass Report that utilizes a heavily-sourced report by Jon Rappoport, the primary reason why Monsanto is pushing for a lawsuit against a county that decides its own laws, forcing them to accept their product, is because the judge has enough reason to take Monsanto’s side. Barry Kurren is the U.S. federal magistrate overseeing Monsanto’s bold move in forcing the country into accepting GMO crops. All one needs to do is research his many connections (mostly through his wife, Faye W. Kurren) to see Barry may not be the right judge to oversee this lawsuit in the first place.

First, Faye W. Kurren used to be president of the University of Hawaii Foundation. This is a big deal because back in September 6, 2011, Monsanto donated $500,000 to the university to establish the Monsanto Research Fellows Fund for plant science. One year before that, Monsanto gave $100,000 for their scholarship fund. Second, Faye also served as a trustee of the Nature Conservancy, a conservation organization with an established relationship with Monsanto. As a matter of fact, the company itself specifically writes this on their official website.

“Monsanto has supported for The Nature Conservancy for years.”

Presently, Faye W. Kurren is currently serving as a board member for the First Hawaiian Bank, which has openly praised GMOs. As a matter of fact, one of the quotes on the bank’s official website reads as follows.

“Kauai is an ideal research laboratory for the seed corn industry because at least three crops per year can be grown, compared to Mainland operations that can produce only one to two. As a result, Kauai’s seed corn industry continues to expand its crop base and infrastructure. There are currently five parent seed corn operations on the island: [biotech GM giants] Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Syngenta, Dow Monsanto, and BASF.”

Monsanto

Faye W. Kurren, the wife of the judge overseeing the lawsuit, has been a part of many organizations with established relationships with Monsanto. (via Google)

Now to be fair, just because Barry Kurren’s wife has been and is currently connected with Monsanto does not mean he will automatically side with the company. Barry may go into this lawsuit unbiased. However, the connections aren’t explained to justify that he’ll side with Monsanto, but that he is in a bit of a dilemma. Jon Rappoport summed up this dilemma best when he wrote the following.

“These academic, corporate, non-profit, bank connections are part of Hawaii’s overall social and political networks, which form a ‘community of interest.’ What would happen if Judge Kurren suddenly ruled against Monsanto? How many shocks would ripple out into protected interests? How many social friendships would suddenly collapse? How embarrassing would it be for Faye Kurren? How much easier would it be to ‘honor’ those connections and friendships and moneyed interests by siding with Monsanto?”

With all the connections Judge Barry Kurren has with GMOs and Monsanto through his wife, do you think he’ll be biased? If not, do you agree with Jon Rappoport that Barry is now stuck between a rock and a hard place in making his decision?
Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/1670899/judge-overseeing-lawsuit-maui-hawaii-banning-gmos-monsanto/#7YkozTo0tkvkxmC5.99

Founding of Ya-Ka-Ama: by John Trippo

•December 17, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Excerpt from Interview with John Trippo about the 1970 Occupation of the Land that became known as Ya-Ka-Ama (Our Land). The Ya-Ka-Ama Media Project began in 1974 with a grant from Sonoma County Revenue Sharing funds; to purchase video equipment for the purpose of recording the cultural activities of Native Americans and creating a library of media materials. Since then, we have recorded numerous activities featuring topics including; basket-weaving, crafts, dancing, singing, foods, games, sports, and storytelling, as well as oral histories of local tribal members.

MISSION STATEMENT

“To support traditional Native culture and values; to give Native People the tools to become contributing members of their communities; and to improve educational opportunities and resources for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians” 

In order to maintain the preservation activities of our endeavor, we are seeking financial assistance from a variety of sources. If you or someone you know may wish to contribute their time or resources, please contact: Ya-Ka-Ama Indian Education & Development, (707) 887-1541; FAX (707) 887-1585; Email: info@ya-ka-ama.org

POMO STORYTELLING: Elsie Allen: Pomo Basketweaver (1980)

•December 17, 2014 • Leave a Comment
The Geysers near were held as sacred space to the Pomo Indians.

The Geysers near were held as sacred space to the Pomo Indians.

Excerpt from interview and demonstration at Ya-Ka-Ama in 1980.

The Ya-Ka-Ama Media Project began in 1974 with a grant from Sonoma County Revenue Sharing funds; to purchase video equipment for the purpose of recording the cultural activities of Native Americans and creating a library of media materials. Since then, we have recorded numerous activities featuring topics including; basket-weaving, crafts, dancing, singing, foods, games, sports, and storytelling, as well as oral histories of local tribal members. In order to maintain the preservation activities of our endeavor, we are seeking financial assistance from a variety of sources. If you or someone you know may wish to contribute their time or resources, please contact:
Ya-Ka-Ama Indian Education & Development,
(707) 887-1541; FAX (707) 887-1585; Email: info@ya-ka-ama.org

Excerpt from interview and demonstration at Ya-Ka-Ama in 1980.

The Ya-Ka-Ama Media Project began in 1974 with a grant from Sonoma County Revenue Sharing funds; to purchase video equipment for the purpose of recording the cultural activities of Native Americans and creating a library of media materials. Since then, we have recorded numerous activities featuring topics including; basket-weaving, crafts, dancing, singing, foods, games, sports, and storytelling, as well as oral histories of local tribal members. In order to maintain the preservation activities of our endeavor, we are seeking financial assistance from a variety of sources. If you or someone you know may wish to contribute their time or resources, please contact:
Ya-Ka-Ama Indian Education & Development,
(707) 887-1541; FAX (707) 887-1585; Email: info@ya-ka-ama.org

Largest Storm to Hit Eel River Basin Since 1964 Christmas Flood. What Does this Mean? Remembering the 1964 Eel River Humboldt and Mendocino County Flood

•December 11, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Largest Storm to Hit Eel River Basin Since 1964 Christmas Flood. What Does this Mean?

Fernbridge Charts

Video Below Presents what happened in the Eel River Canyon in the 1964 Flood.

Van Duzen and Parts of Eel Now Predicted to Flood Tonight or Early Tomorrow

ALERT FOR RESIDENTS OF LOW-LYING AREAS OF BRIDGEVILLE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS and SOUTHERN PARTS OF HWY 101

Highway 36 at Bridgeville is projected to flood early tomorrow morning around 3 am and flooding is also projected along Highway 254 at the Avenue of the Giants. The Sheriff is requesting that people move away from the low-lying areas near those places, as well as the low-lying areas along Highway 101 in the southern parts of the county. The volunteer fire departments in Bridgeville and Carlotta have gotten the message and will relay it to people in those areas. The Sheriff will also send personnel to those areas to let people know the river will flood those areas tonight.

The Eel River at Fernbridge and Scotia will both hit flood stage tomorrow at 1 p.m. Sheriff will have personnel (possibly those who live in Ferndale) on duty and on the other side of the river in Ferndale before then.

Please pass this word along if you have friends in those areas.
Also, Redwood Creek west of Redway is rising rapidly and the bridge near Whittemore Grove has a lot of standing water.
Please travel only if necessary, drive slowly and take all necessary precautions.

(AUDIO) Summing Up Today’s Storm and Previewing Tomorrow’s Flooding

Storm radar animation

PGE outage map: call 800-PGE-5000 with outages (911 for downed power lines)

CHP Traffic Incidents

River Forecast Center

Caltrans Road Information

1964 Storm & Flood Damage of the Northwestern Pacific RR between Willits and Arcata


Pictures From the 1964 Eel River Flood:

Pepperwood Weott 1964 Flood

Fernbridge Humboldt County.

Fernbridge Humboldt County.

Fernbridge Humboldt County from the West looking East during High Waters, not yet over bridge.

Fernbridge Humboldt County from the West looking East during High Waters, not yet over bridge.

Fernbridge, Flooding but not over bridge!

Fernbridge, Flooding but not over bridge!

Christmas Flood of 1964 History:

The Christmas flood of 1964 was a major flood that took place in the Pacific Northwest and California between December 18, 1964 and January 7, 1965, spanning the Christmas holiday.[1] Considered a 100-year flood,[2] it was the worst flood in recorded history on nearly every major stream and river in coastal Northern California and one of the worst to affect the Willamette River in Oregon. It also had an impact on parts of southwest Washington, Idaho, and Nevada.[1][3] In Oregon seventeen people died as a result of the disaster, and it caused hundreds of millions of dollars in damage.[3] The flooding on the Willamette covered 152,789 acres (61,831.5 ha).[4] The National Weather Service rated the flood as the fifth most destructive weather event in Oregon in the 20th century.[5] California Governor Pat Brown was quoted as saying that a flood of similar proportions could “happen only once in 1,000 years,” and it was often referred to later as the Thousand Year Flood.[1] The flood killed 19 people, heavily damaged or completely devastated at least 10 towns, destroyed all or portions of more than 20 major highway and county bridges, carried away millions of board feet of lumber and logs from mill sites, devastated thousands of acres of agricultural land, killed 4,000 head of livestock, and caused $100 million in damage in Humboldt County, California alone.[6][7] North Coast

The Eel, Smith, Klamath, Trinity, Salmon, and Mad rivers, as well as other rivers and large streams, all went well beyond flood stage and peaked nearly simultaneously around December 21 and 22, breaking previous records (notably those set in the “hundred year” flood of 1955 in most cases).[1][7] Sixteen state highway bridges were destroyed in California’s 1st congressional district, most of them on Highway 101, and another ten county bridges were destroyed in Humboldt County.[7] The flood devastated the tracks and multiple stream and river crossings of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad, the region’s only major railroad, and related spur lines.Many communities of Del Norte and Humboldt counties suffered massive power outages and were left isolated (or completely cut off from the rest of the state for a period), including the region’s larger populated areas around Humboldt Bay, such as Eureka and Arcata, despite the fact that those cities were located on higher ground and not in the path of raging rivers. Unfortunate riverside communities like Klamath, Orleans, Myers Flat, Weott, South Fork, Shively, Pepperwood, Stafford, and Ti-Bar were completely destroyed by flood waters; some of them were never rebuilt and none regained their former status. Metropolitan, Rio Dell, and Scotia were significantly damaged.[7] Crescent City, still recovering from the tsunami created by the 1964 Alaska earthquake only nine months earlier, also suffered from the floods.[7]Over 22 inches (550 mm) of rain fell on the Eel River basin in a span of two days. By December 23, 752,000 cubic feet per second (21,300 m3/s) of water rushed down the Eel River at Scotia (still upstream from the confluence of the Van Duzen River),[6] 200,000 cubic feet per second (5,660 m3/s) more than the 1955 flood, and more than the average discharge of the entire Mississippi River basin.[9] Just under 200,000 cubic feet per second (5,660 m3/s) of water flowed down the South Fork Eel River alone, causing severe damage along its entire length.[6] Every single stream gauge on the Eel River was destroyed.[7] The flood crest at Miranda was 46 feet (14 m). Signs were later placed on top of tall poles to mark the unusual height of the water.[10]The Smith River, located in Del Norte County near the Oregon border, reached flows of 228,000 cubic feet per second (6,460 m3/s) at Hiouchi,[11] easily surpassing the 1955 flood’s previous record of 165,000 cubic feet per second (4,670 m3/s).[7] The town of Gasquet received 26.6 inches (676 mm) of rain over an eight-day period, and Crescent City received 9.2 inches (230 mm).[7]The Klamath River reached flows of 557,000 cubic feet per second (15,800 m3/s),[12] submerging the town of Klamath under 15 feet (4.6 m) of water.[7]One of the Klamath’s largest tributaries, the Trinity River, also flooded and wrought destruction along its length. The Trinity, however, did not break the 1955 flood’s records because of the newly constructed Trinity Dam, which stored 372,200 acre feet (459,100,000 m3) of runoff from the storm.[7] Nonetheless, an impressive 231,000 cubic feet per second (6,540 m3/s) of water rushed down the river at Hoopa.[13]Between December 20 and December 26, a staggering 10,390,000 acre feet (12.82 km3) of water flowed into the Pacific Ocean from the combined rivers and streams on the North Coast.[7]

Highway 101 Washout 1964 Eel River Flood

Riodell Bridge, Humboldt County, 1964 Flood

Riodell Bridge, Humboldt County, 1964 Flood

Highwater Mark 1964 Flood, Humboldt County Ca

Highwater Mark 1964 Flood, Humboldt County Ca

Car Submerged in Redwoods from 1964 Eel River Flood

Car Submerged in Redwoods from 1964 Eel River Flood

Island Mountain Tunnel No Flood Humboldt County

Island Mountain Tunnel No Flood
Humboldt County

Island Mountain Tunnel After 1964 Flood. Water Shot through the Tunnel “LIKE A SIPHON” Flowing a hole across the river on it’s exit from the nearly several mile long tunnel in the 1964 Flood.

Reproductions from
The Clark H. Gleason Archive
Times-Standard
Humboldt Historical Society

1964 Eel River Flood

In December 1964, unusual heavy snows followed by a Pineapple Express rain created a tremendous flood, with the warm rain melting all snow below 7,000′ in a short time. As much as 21 inches of rain was recorded in a 48 hour interval in some areas of the watershed. The flood left enormous damage behind to both manmade structures and to the fish habitat. Entire towns were swept away.

During the 1964 flood, 105 million tons of suspended sediment were transported past Scotia during a 3-day period, compared to 85 million tons transported during the previous 8 years (Brown and Ritter, 1971).

Horses in Potter Valley after an unusual snowfall in December 1964. Typically the valley floor receives a dusting every few years, and it doesn’t stick long.

1964 Eel River Flood Then, it started to rain, heavily, with tropical moisture, bringing not only the rain from that storm, but also immediately melting the snow. Cape Horn Dam is well under water here, some time after the peak flows.

1964 Eel River Flood This picture was taken after the water had begun to recede. Eyewitness accounts say the water was well over the top of the concrete you see on the side of the dam in this picture, and that water over both Cape Horn and Scott Dams was so high that you could barely tell a dam was under the flow. (This is Cape Horn Dam.)

1964 Eel River Flood

11964 Eel River Flood damage to the Van Arsdale fish ladder

The damaged fish ladder at Van Arsdale.

1964 Eel River Flood

1964 Eel River flood bridge washoutThis bridge just upstream of Van Arsdale was completely destroyed. Most bridges on the Eel suffered a similar fate.

1964 Eel River flood bridge washoutAnother view of the bridge remainder. It is a challenge to photograph what isn’t there.

1964 Eel River flood bridge washoutDebris from bridges and trees and anything in the river’s path was left on the banks.

1964 Eel River at Van Arsdale after the floodA few days after the flood, the river is quiet again. But, you can still see the waterline high on the concrete.

Additional accounts of the 1964 Eel River flood:

Five men on a rescue trip face drowning with motor stalled and boat awash in the turbulent Eel River. Some of group are presumably victims picked up from homes. Rope from shore saved party.

High Waters! The floods of 1955 and 1964

The floods of 1955 and 1964 couldn’t have come at a worse time. The hillslopes of Humboldt County had just undergone the most intensive land disturbance in recorded history, as a result of the post World War II logging boom. Hillslopes were stripped of their protective forests, roads criss crossed the slopes in all directions, and many areas were intensively burned after the logging was completed. When large rainstorms hit the disturbed slopes, most of the water quickly drained off, rather than slowly soaking into moss and litter covered soils beneath hundreds of feet of protective forest canopy. The results were catastrophic, as many of these photos show. Today there are still parts of the Eel River that are still recovering from the floods of 55/64. Sediment loads are still very high and the fish habitat is still on a slow march toward recovery. For example, the lower mainstem of the Eel River has lost most of its pre-flood habitat diversity. Sediment loads must dramatically decrease before we can expect the habitat to return, and this will take widespread effort involving a combination of upslope and instream restoration efforts. Treating roads for sediment production is an important place to start. Using bioengineering approaches to reduce bank erosion can also help, but working in dynamic channels is always a risk.

Weott was a dead town of houses submerged to the roof tops, floating debris and utter desolaton when this aerial photograph was taken.

The Bull Creek Watershed reshaped by timber tax

When the land and timber tax structure changed in 1947, land-use practices took a sudden turn for the worse. Prior to 1947, landowners in Humboldt County paid 60 cents per acre in timber tax, and 20 cents per acre land tax. When the combined taxes rose to over 3 dollars per acre, many landowners were motivated to clear their lands just to reduce their tax burden. (After the timber was cleared, only the 20 cent/acre land tax was paid).

The Rampaging Eel River literally ripped the Paul Mudgett Memorial Bridge asunder. Rio Dell is in the background. The Eel River sawmills were formerly located at the lower left. Note the debris remaining where houses smashed against the left side of the span.

In the Bull Creek watershed, a comparison of aerial photos between 1947 and 1954 shows the dramatic changes to forest cover in just a 7 year period. The 1947 photo-collage shows a dense cover of forest, with scattered grasslands showing up as light areas. By 1954, the light areas reflect intensive clear-cut logging. When the storms came in 1955, the recently logged and burned hillslopes fell apart.

Click on map to view a larger image.

The cabin shown here was half-buried by the 1955 flood in the Bull Creek basin. Sediment from landslides and road failures filled channels and buried bridges. By 1964, even more of the basin was logged, and the next round of flooding brought even more severe impacts. Parts of Bull Creek are still recovering today from these impacts.

~ Willits Bypass UPDATE December~- Caltrans Won’t Reveal Why they Need $65,000,000 MORE for Willits Bypass….

•December 7, 2014 • Leave a Comment

~  Willits Bypass UPDATE December~-
Caltrans Won’t Reveal Why they Need $65,000,000 MORE
for Willits Bypass….
Willits Bypass Cost Over Runs
http://abc7news.com/video/embed/?pid=424755

Caltrans’ troubled Willits Bypass project is now two years behind and getting a lot more expensive.

Caltrans had estimated the bypass would cost $210 million. But next week the agency will ask the California Transportation Commission for $64.7 million in additional funding for what it calls “unforeseen issues.”

ABC7 News has learned that request includes only a small portion of the tens of millions of dollars needed for environmental mitigation, so the price is likely to go even higher.

Caltrans is building a freeway bypass on Highway 101 around the town of Willits in Mendocino County.

ABC7 News started investigating the Willits bypass soon after work began last year. The project is now about half finished and it has not gone smoothly.

In most projects, Caltrans gives a detailed breakdown of how they will spend extra money they are requesting, but not in this case. Caltrans is refusing to tell us exactly how your tax money is going to be spent. Instead they presented a risk analysis that shows a “50 percent probability, the additional cost needed to finish the project will be $64.7 million.”

A look back at the many problems during bypass construction gives you some idea of how costs have escalated.

From the start, there have been angry protests and lawsuits from environmental groups. Massive erosion at the site sent pollution streaming into a protected creek and Caltrans was charged with violating the U.S. Clean Water Act. Construction crews accidentally damaged or destroyed a known Native American archaeological site that was supposed to be protected by law.

Local tribes say Caltrans has now discovered about 30 more potentially important Indian sites in the bypass area. They accuse Caltrans of not doing enough to find and protect their sacred history.

Native Americans march in San Francisco

READ MORE: Tribe demands government stop Caltrans, save sacred sites in Willits

In September, Sherwood Valley Tribal chairman Mike Fitzgerral told ABC7 News Caltrans “hired all these experts and they failed.”

The bypass is designed to route Highway 101 traffic around a bottleneck where traffic backs up in the city of Willits. The Mendocino Council of Governments supports it.

“This is for the benefit of goods movement and the traveling public and for those people in the Bay Area who come up here on their weekends and on their vacations,” said Phil Dow, executive director of the council.

The project is huge, six miles long, running through habitat for threatened coho salmon and steelhead trout. It also includes filling in more than 40 acres of federally-protected wetlands.

The impact is so severe, Caltrans is required to do the largest environmental mitigation in its history to compensate. But Caltrans has had trouble meeting permit requirements.

Ellen Drell from the Willits Environmental Center accused Caltrans of bullying saying, “They delay, they drag their feet. They basically don’t do what the agencies are asking them to do,” he said.

Open space in Willits

Caltrans now refuses to talk to ABC7 News on camera about the Willits project, but last October Caltrans spokesman Phil Frisbie disputed that charge. “We are going to follow any requirements by our permitting agencies,” he said.

That’s what Caltrans said, but in June the department was so far behind in its environmental requirements, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers suspended the permit and shut down most work on the bypass. It took almost three weeks to broker a deal to get the work going again.

The Corps required Caltrans to consider redesigning the Northern Interchange of the bypass to reduce the impact on wetlands. Caltrans submitted a new design and the Corps is evaluating it. The proposed plan is not being released to the public.

Caltrans request for additional money lists additional construction problems including “contaminated wood waste disposal, areas of unanticipated settling, plan discrepancies as well as roadway compaction issues.”

The bypass was planned for years as a four lane freeway, but at this point, only two lanes are being built. Even so, Caltrans now appears likely to spend as much money as was originally planned for four lanes.

Caltrans documents estimate the bypass will save drivers 10 minutes during peak traffic times.

Caltrans to Spray Herbicides on 67 Acres of Eel River Headwaters and Wetlands ~ Willits Bypass

•December 6, 2014 • Leave a Comment

CALTRANS HERBICIDE WILLITS LITTLE LAKE

CalTrans expects to use herbicides on about 67 acres of its property over a period of the next 3 years in Little Lake Valley as part of its mitigation plans. This is according to new information released by CalTrans in November.

CalTrans advised the Sherwood Valley Rancheria, Coyote Valley Band of Pomo and Round Valley Indian Tribes in a Nov. 7 letter saying it intended to use herbicides on the mitigation lands and erroneously that CalTrans had already received clearance to use the herbicide from the Regional Water Quality Control Board.

The letters to tribal leaders signed by CalTrans Environmental Manager-South John D. Webb, claimed CalTrans submitted a “Herbicide Use Plan” for review and approval on Sept. 25. The letter then said “The Plan was later approved.”

When TWN requested a copy of the herbicide proposal and the subsequent approval, CalTrans spokesman Phil Frisbie issued this statement, “The herbicide plan is still a draft, and the water board has provided feedback and conceptual approval. The actual plan will be completed and submitted after the mitigation contract for invasive plant removal is awarded and the contractor chooses an herbicide, how it will be applied, etc.”

A call from Brendon Thompson of the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board confirmed Frisbie’s characterization of the situation.

The plan is considered a draft, in part because the full extent of the herbicide use, including the herbicide’s active ingredients, the way it will be applied and the full extent of application await the actual issuance of a contracts for the mitigation project during 2015 and 2016.

The areas proposed for treatment with herbicides are the same areas which are being “enhanced” to improve wetland functions.

The conceptual plan rules out aerial spraying as well as the application of herbicides when “surface water is present.”

While the conceptual plan limits herbicide use to Himalayan blackberry, “the contractor’s weed management plan will address all weed control activities on the project, including the eradication of the Himalayan blackberry. The plan will incorporate specific information concerning the general time period and location of expected herbicide use,” according to Webb. Willits Bypss Before and After

It is unclear whether this future plan can expand the use of herbicides to other mitigation areas and to control other weeds.

Webb states, “According to the 2014 Habitat Mitigation and Monitoring Proposal, invasive plants will be controlled using the most appropriate means as dictated by the species of concern. Caltrans will utilize the most appropriate current knowledge and management practices regarding the species and take into account any location constraints. We believe most of the plant species can be controlled with manual means.”

CalTrans states it needs to use herbicides to avoid delays, due to the time it would take to manually eliminate these difficult invasive plants.

Caltrans logo

READ MORE @ The Willits News http://www.willitsnews.com/ci_27076216/caltrans-use-herbicides

It’s happening: GMO corn no longer resists insects

•December 5, 2014 • Leave a Comment

According to farmers in Brazil, GMO Bt corn seeds made by Monsanto, Dow Chemical, DuPont, and Syngenta are no longer resisting pests, namely the corn leaf worm, or Spodoptera frugiperda. The farmers want the companies to reimburse them for the three rounds of pesticides they’ve had to spray on top of their GMO crops, since the companies’ products failed to deliver on their promises. The Brazilian government is wary of how dependent its farmers have become on toxic chemicals, and the farmers are worried they’ll no longer be able to plant anything but GMO seeds. When is humanity going to learn that it has to co-exist with some bugs – that when you fight bugs, they will fight back…and will most likely win? The Resident discusses.

Glyphosate Resistance

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 9,149 other followers