RAIDS and LOOTING of Mendocino Medical Marijuana Farms Exposed on Bay Area CBS 5 News

•November 5, 2015 • Leave a Comment


Medical marijuana farm owners in Mendocino County, California say the Mendocino Sheriff Department  is out of control, and are basically raiding their farms without cause and that Law Endforcement is looting their personal property for personal gains.

Pot farm owners say police have seized “plants and other assets on private property in commando-style raids – without a search warrant – and making their agencies millions in the process,” according to a CBS San Francisco investigative report.

More from CBS San Francisco:

Recently, Mickey Bailey completed his first harvest of marijuana on land he bought in Mendocino County two years ago to grow medical pot. Last year was a bust, literally.

He said armed commandos dropped from the sky and chopped down his garden, even though he says he was growing only 25 plants, the legal limit in the county. “They had no badges, they were in black, the helicopter was not marked. There was no indication of law enforcement at all,” said Bailey.

Dozens of other growers say the same thing happened to them.

“It happens so often that it’s called a rip and run,” said defense attorney Omar Figueroa. Without a warrant,… http://fb.me/6QgmEkaZx

“It increasingly looks like the Justice Department guidelines are not being interpreted in the same way as they were intended,”

Watch: Marijuana farmers claim Mendocino shakedown in plant seizures

http://launch.newsinc.com/?type=VideoPlayer/Single&widgetId=1&trackingGroup=69016&siteSection=nationalst&videoId=29884827

Recently the very same Sheriff Department accused of Illegally Ripping Up Crops and looting peoples homes of cash and jewelry and valuables, had their radar set on the local Native American Tribe who had been very upfront and vocal  in the community in their plans to create a Tribal Cannabis Collective were Targeted. Once again, trampling tribal rights, trampling tribal sovereignty, the Mendocino Sheriff raided and looted the local Pomo Tribe injuring tribal memners in the aggressive paramilitary raid.

So, even After repeated negotiations and to the surprise of the tribe who had been working within the boundaries of their tribal sovereignty and government, the Mendocino Sheriff Department headed by the very same Sheriff Tom Allman raided and looted the local Pinoleville Pomo Indian Rancheria in Ukiah. Of course this was just one of many atrocities committed by the County of Mendocino in what locals describe as a 150 year genocide by Mendocino County Government against the local indian Tribes since the inception of the “Mendocino War”, also known by scholars as the “Mendocino Genocide”.

Read More about the looting and raid s aimed at the Sovereign Pinoleville Nation Below:

Pinoleville Pomo Sovereign Marijuana Farm Raided; 

Mendocino’s 150 Year Genocide of Pomo Peoples Continues
Pinoleville Pomo Sovereign Marijuana Farm Raided;

& Why Mendocino Should LEAVE THE POMO ALONE

Genocide Mendocino

After numerous Attempts to Cooperate with the County and Sheriff’s Requests, the County and Sheriff Department Turn Their Backs on the Pomo People, Continuing a 150+ Year Tradition of Genocide and Oppression Against the Pomo Peoples by Mendocino County Government.

Pinoleville Pomo Raided

The Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office raided a medical marijuana growing operation on Indian land just north of Ukiah on Tuesday, disrupting a high-profile project that had garnered national attention and was hailed by tribal leaders as a new way to generate jobs and revenue for cash-strapped tribes.

Deputies eradicated some 400 pot plants from an outdoor location. At another location, they began dismantling a “highly sophisticated” chemical laboratory where honey oil — a sticky, concentrated pot product used to make edible medicine— was being manufactured under the auspices of the Pinoleville Pomo Nation, said Sheriff’s Capt. Greg Van Patten. More than 100 pounds of trimmed and drying marijuana also was found inside the laboratory building, a former car dealership on North State Street.

Tribal representatives who helped launch what is widely believed to be the first large-scale, tribal-operated medical pot operation in the state had contended they had a right to grow marijuana on the tribe’s 99-acre rancheria for the benefit of the estimated 250-member tribe.

They decried Tuesday’s raids, which were accompanied by court-issued warrants, on what they claim are legal operations.

“I think what they’re doing is not right,” said Nori Baldridge, the tribe’s director of economic development. “This is sovereign land and this is a sovereign nation,” she said.

“We were shocked,” said Mike Canales, president of the tribe’s business board. He said he’s been in frequent contact with Sheriff Tom Allman and expected to be notified before there was any kind of raid. He also contends the sheriff does not have authority over the tribe and said he will be asking the county grand jury to investigate the issue.

Neither he nor Baldridge is a member of the tribe, but the two have been instrumental in creating the marijuana operation. Tribal Chairwoman Leona Williams could not immediately be reached for comment.

Sweatlodge Pomo Underground

For those of you not familiar with what sovereign means, in lay-mans terms it means the tribes have the federally protected right to decide, vote, and enforce their own set of tribal laws on their own tribal lands. These are lands which lay “outside” the reach of local jurisdictions, for instance the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Department. Essentially the Reservations and the tribal lands are recognized as “Sovereign Nations” with the right to decide their own destiny and the right to choose their own tribal laws. The Poinoleville Tribe has decided to partner up with the Very Successful Coilorado Based United Cannabis as well as Fox Barry Farms, two very powerful groups of financiers who are backed with millions of dollars as well as lobbyists and very smart, tactful and wise attorneys and lawyers. In other words, this is serious business which could bring the tribe a great deal of money: Except there is a catch!

Coyote

Mendocino County Sheriff Department Failure to Respect Sovereign Tribal Law:

Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman (the main authority and decision maker on marijuana in Mendocino County) has said the legality of such a large-scale proposal was questionable, even though the tribe is considered a sovereign nation.It seems the Mendocino County Sheriff who has a history with local tribal members and tribal government which goes back to the “Bear Lincoln Man Hunt Days” does not respect or honor for the sovereign rights of the Pinoleville Pomo Nation. On Wednesday Allman issued a written statement, disclosing that he had met with a tribal representative earlier in the day.

“Due to conflicting interpretations of state and local marijuana laws/ordinances relating to Tribal lands, no agreement was reached as to the legal operation of the marijuana cultivation,” the release states.

“It is the intent of the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office to fairly and equally enforce the law throughout Mendocino County. If a violation of state or local law is observed in Mendocino County, the appropriate law enforcement action will be taken,” he wrote, adding that he has the authority to enforce criminal laws on Indian lands.

pomo bark roundhouse

Could it be hot embers from “Old Feuds” Which are Keeping Sheriff Allman from Respecting Pomo Nation Sovereign Rights on the Pomo National Lands?

Buds and Humming Bird

What reason would the Sheriff have to keep these investors which have already invested Millions of Dollars into Tribal Casino’s and Tribal Gas Stations in our area from investing in the Good Will of the Pinoleville Tribe to produce Medicine for dying and sick patients, we believe it is nothing more than old embers which are still hot which the Sheriff Department still holds onto which is keeping the Sheriff from doing what is right!

Mendocino Counties Genocide Against the Pomo Indians:

No Mention of Mendocino County government and it’s current relationship with the Aboriginal Native Peoples of this area would be complete with out a mention of the “Mendocino Genocide” which occurred by the County of Mendocino and the State of California against these very same tribes the Sheriff Department is fighting and still oppressing today:

Mendocino’s Genocide: Hidden History of Willits, Little Lake Valley

pomo ceremonial necklace

~According to the Press Democrat _-

Mendocino County sheriff’s deputies raid tribe’s pot operation near Ukiah

Why Can’t the Mendocino County Sheriff Department be Trusted by the Community?

THE “OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE” From the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office:

Several months ago the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office began receiving information about a marijuana cultivation operation being established by the Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribe in Ukiah, California.

Since that time personnel from the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office had numerous contacts with representatives from the tribe concerning why the operation was being established.

During those contacts it was determined the operation was utilizing open land located at 650 Pinoleville Road and a building at 2150 North State Street both being locations in Ukiah, California.

Several aerial over-flights of 650 Pinoleville Road were conducted within the last two months showing approximately 400 growing marijuana plants at that location.

On 09-18-2015 Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office Deputies were called to 2150 North State Street due to the activation of a burglary alarm.

Upon arrival Deputies contacted several individuals who were transporting cut marijuana plants from 650 Pinoleville Road to the building. These individuals identified themselves as being employed by the Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribe.

On 09-22-2015 the County of Mendocino Marijuana Eradication Team obtained search warrants for 650 Pinoleville Road and 2150 North State Street.

Each search warrant was subsequently served and 382 growing marijuana plants were eradicated from 650 Pinoleville Road. Investigators noticed several marijuana plants had already been harvested from the location.

During the search of the building at 2150 North State Street a sophisticated honey oil chemical extraction laboratory was discovered in addition to over 100 pounds of trimmed/processed marijuana.

No individuals were present at both locations when the search warrants were served and investigations are on-going at this time.

In 1953 Public Law 280 mandated a substantial transfer of jurisdiction from the federal government to the state level in California as to situations occurring on Indian Country.

As a result, The Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office is mandated to assume jurisdiction on Indian Country located in the unincorporated areas of Mendocino County and to enforce California state laws including those listed in the crime/incident section of this press release.

TRUE Mendocino County History

The TRUTH Shall Prevail In The End!

Genocide

Pomo Indians as

Pomo Indians as “Herded Up” onto Mendocino County Reservation in the 1850’s. Notice there are only women and children, ;local male indians were called “bucks” by maurading bands of genocidists and were sytematically killed. Starting In the 1850’s POMO as well as many other local tribes which were exterminated by the genocide were subjected to a war of extermination and genocide throughout Mendocino County Theses cold hearted acts of Genocide against Elderly, Men Women and even babies became known as the “Mendocino Wars” and were documented by Congressional Inquiry.

Prior to the “Manifest Destiny” in which whites thought it was their “God Given Right” to conquer and destroy the “Pagan ways and Peoples of the New World” as well as steal their land in the name of “God”, Mendocino County had one of the largest populations of Native American peoples in the State. These tribes spent the winters in the inland Valley’s such as Ukiah, Willits and Laytonville, and camped on the coast during the spring and summer where they collected seafood and grasses as well as cultivated grains by means of burning valley fields and plating pinole( a mix of native seeds and grains) which were collected the year before using large baskets which had the seeds “beat into the basket”

Pomo Seed Gatherer

. The “Mendocino War”, just a small part of the “Mendocino Genocide”, was a violent act of Mendocino County and California State Sponsored genocide perpetuated from July 1859 to January 18, 1860, against the local native people including the Cahto, Coastal Yuki, Wailaki, Yuki, Huchnom (now extinct) as well as other local Mendocino County tribes which also were eliminated by these very same acts of genocide. The Genocide in Mendocino County Ca was committed by groups of white men from Willits and Ukiah mounted on horses and carrying firearms. The Eel River Rangers as they were called, were paid and sponsored by the State of California and under the directions of local “pioneers”. This genocide, aimed against a peaceful local community of Hunter, Gatherer Native Americans which had inhabited Mendocino County Ca for thousands of years was caused by settler intrusion onto native lands in the name of “Manifest Destiny”. These intrusions resulted in the deaths of thousands of local natives including the elderly, men women and even babies. In 1859, a band of locally sponsored “RANGERS” , (yes this is where the term ranger comes from), led by Walter S. Jarboe, organized by Judge Serranus C Hastings called the Eel River Rangers raided the countryside in an effort to kill and forcibly remove natives from their Native Homes where they had lived for thousands of years and move them onto the Mendocino Reservation where today’s Fort Bragg stands as well as Nome Cult Farm, near Covelo, now called Round Valley Reservation. The settlers of Mendocino County wanted the Aboriginal Native Mendocino Lands and had absolutely no problem with committing acts of murder, genocide including the wholesale slaughter of entire Mendocino Indian villages in order to steal the land.

By the time the Eel River Rangers were disbanded in 1860, by his own estimates, Jarboe and his men had killed 283 warriors, captured 292, and had admitted to killing countless women and children in Mendocino County. The Rangers themselves only suffered 5 casualties in the 23 engagements, showing the extent of the slaughter. Many people of the time as well as many historians today claim the number of Native Mendocino County Indians exterminated by the Eel River Rangers to be much higher, reaching into the many thousands. The Villages of the Indians were usually attacked at dawn while the Indians were sleeping and most villagers including all the men would be slaughtered, many elderly, women and children would be slaughtered as well, the women and children who survived were forcibly kidnapped and “driven” by whip to the nearest reservations. where they faced more brutality, including sexual assaults, kidnapping as well as starvation at what has became known as California’s first Concentration Camps, today’s “reservations”.

Even when forced onto the reservation in Covelo, local Native Peoples were forced into slavery and faced starvation. Women and Children were constantly raped and sexually assaulted by pioneer men of Mendocino County who would “raid” the reservation.. Children were also kidnapped from Round Valley reservation,, tied onto horses and “packed” or “driven” to the Sacramento Valley where they were sold as sexual concubines to wealthy white ranchers or sold into slavery on one of the many farms in the Sacramento Valley.

Kidnapping indians mendocino

California Paid for the Mendocino County Genocide;

The bill to the state for the rangers’ services amounted to $11,143.43. Scholars, however, claim that the damage to the area and natives in particular was even higher than reported, especially given the vast number of raiding parties formed outside of the Eel River Rangers. Frustrated with the inadequacy of federal protection, settlers formed their own raiding parties against the natives, joining Jarboe in his mission to rid Round Valley of its native population. Those that survived were moved to the Nome Cult Farm, where they experienced hardships typical of the reservation system of the day. After the conflict, contemporaries claimed that the conflict was more of a slaughter than a war, and later historians have labeled it a genocide.

Pomo Village House

Pomo Linguistic Map

Henry Raschen Interior Of A Pomo Dwelling 1883

Henry Raschen Interior Of A Pomo Dwelling 1883

Pomo house. Donated by: Zella Bleyhl

Pomo Indians Today

Pomo Indians Today

California’s First Tribally Sponsored “Medical Marijuana Medicinal Farm” has began preparing for planting on their Sovereign Tribal Lands North of Ukiah on the Pinoleville Pomo Nation’s rancheria, along Highway 101. Where once only Mono-crops of chemical and pesticide grown grapes were grown there is now a new organic crop in the neighborhood, Medical Marijuana!

Dec. 11, 2014 Report from US News and World Report Revealing tribes can legally grow and sell medical marijuana.

Dec. 11, 2014 Report from US News and World Report Revealing tribes can legally grow and sell medical marijuana.

Mendocino Counties Genocide Against the Pomo Indians:

No Mention of Mendocino County government and it’s current relationship with the Aboriginal Native Peoples of this area would be complete with out a mention of the “Mendocino Genocide” which occurred by the County of Mendocino and the State of California against these very same tribes the Sheriff Department is fighting and still oppressing today:

Mendocino’s Genocide: Hidden History of Willits, Little Lake Valley

Genocide

The Willits – Little Lake Valley was called Mitomkai meaning big valley, mato = big + kai valley, by the Mitomkai Pomo Indian Tribelets which lived and claimed the Little Lake Valley as their home for thousands of years. The heavily populated Valley supported a population of over 4,000 in ancient times, the Mitomkai Pomo indians lived on the high ground around the Valley. The largest of the Villages, called “mato” or “Big” was situated at the site of present day Willits, on the top of the Hill between Coast Street and Mill Street, there is still the large oak tree which is judged to be around 300 years old standing on this hill today. The Mitomkai Pomo practiced a hunter gatherer life dominated by collection of prairie seeds from the Valley which the Indians cultivated by burning the fields and Meadows in spring and spreading the seeds which were gathered in the fall the year before.

Pomo Woman Gathering Pinole Seeds with Baskets.

The seeds were gathered as they ripened using a long cylindrical basket and a “beating basket” which was used to thresh the seeds into the larger basket. Acorns were gathered in the Fall and stored in winter granaries which kept the acorns fresh and out of the reach of pests.

Acorn Granary

Salmon were harvested in the fall around November and December as Chinook King Salmon and Coho Salmon as well as trout and Steelhead made their annual migrations. The Mitomkai Pomo Territory Extended to the Coast where the Mitomkai Pomo claimed a Village at Big River in Mendocino called Buldam. The Ancient Indian trail to the Coast followed the modern day Willits – Fortbragg Road except the Indian Trails were on the ridgetops. At the Mouth of Big River, at a Village called Buldam by the Mitomkai Pomo Indians, the Indians collected seaweeds, Mussels and Abalone as well as fished the many different Species of Freshwater Fish including Salmon and Steelhead from Big River. Fish, mollusks including mussels and abalone as well as seaweed were dried on the ridge tops above the fog bank on the coast where they kept their villages safe from passing boats canoes and kayaks. The Indians used all sorts of Canoes up and down the California Coast from the Chumash in Santa Barbara to the Yurok of Humboldt County. The Ocean was used as a highway for trade. Many trading spots were found along the Mendocino Coast, from Big River to Mussel Rock. Many tribes from all over the California Coast would gather at Mussel Rock North of Ten Mile River. There on the large hill overlooking Mussel Rock and the Pacific Ocean was a Village called Lilem where high on the overlooking hill was a Subterranean Sweat house Capable of holding 200 people or more for religious ceremony. The many shellmounds as well as midden piles along the Mendocino Coast are testament to the ancient land claims to ancient fishing grounds.

Indian Sweathouse, Big River Mendocino County Ca

Little Lake, Mitomkai Valley hosted large herds of deer and elk as well as large populations of Grizzly Bear and Mountain Lions before the coming of foreign settlers. Many of the Mitomkai Pomo people were rounded up on the Coast as they made their yearly trips to the coast sometime around the year 1855. In 1855 an exploration party from the Bureau of Indian Affairs visited the area looking for a site on which to establish a reservation and, in the spring of 1856, the Mendocino Indian Reservation was established at Noyo.[1] In the summer of 1857, First Lieutenant Horatio G. Gibson, then serving at the Presidio of San Francisco, was ordered to take Company M, 3rd Regiment of Artillery to establish a military post one and one-half miles north of the Noyo River on the Mendocino Indian Reservation. The official date of the establishment of Fort Bragg was June 11, 1857. Its purpose was to maintain order on the reservation, and protect the Indians and reservation lands from settlers. Many Mitomakai Pomo People would never return from their yearly fishing trip to the coast. Instead they were “rounded up” like cattle by cowboys on horses and marched to Fort Bragg, then the headquarters of the Mendocino Indian Reservation. At the reservation the indians faced starvation, disease as well as the kidknapping and rape of their women and children. Other groups which ran away from the Reservation were hunted down by groups and Militias of State Sanctioned and State Paid “Volunteers” such as William Jarboes “Eel River Rangers”.

Mendocino Indian Reservation

As more settlers encroached on Little Lake Valley and Mendocino County, indian hunting grounds were ruined by the hooves of Settlers Cattle which ate the Indians grasses and clovers. Settlers killed the Elk and Deer which had been so carefully manged for millennia. Starving Displaced indians soon turned to killing livestock and cattle to survive. White Settlers retaliated by raiding indian villages during the early morning hours and killing every man woman and child to be found. Soon, every loss of animal was blamed on the indians despite the fact the County hosted a very large population of Mountain Lions and Grizzly Bears who have been found to be the main culprits behind the missing game. In the meantime the Mitomkai Pomo indians were blamed, the Mitomkai were rounded up or killed. Many Children were sold to Ranchers in the Sacramento Valley where they fetched up to a $100 for a girl.

Kidnapping indians mendocino

Genocide of the Mitomkai and Mendocino Indian Tribes “The Mendocino War” Round Valley, located in northeastern Mendocino County in Northern California, was home to various Native American tribes. The most populous of these local tribes were the Yuki, whose territory was roughly 1,100 square miles.[1] The Yuki were not one political people; rather, they were several autonomous groups that shared both language and culture, with each community having its own leadership.[2] In 1853, California started its Indian Reservation System, which was headed by Thomas J. Henley (Superintendent of Indian Affairs), and by 1854 Round Valley was discovered by white settlers.[3] Frank Asbill, the first white man to see the territory, estimated that there were about 20,000 natives in the area at the time. Scholars now believe this number is a little high, but by 1856, there were 12,000 Native Americans in Round Valley.[4] Although a few families moved into native territory, many of the settlers were hunters, fugitives, drifters, and the like. In general, they were people who lived off of the land, who traveled to the area for its resources.[3] In the same year, Thomas Henley sent Simmon Pena Storms to start the Nome Cult Farm.[3] Originally meant to be a resting point for natives and people traveling to the Mendocino Reservation, the Nome Cult Farm grew to become a reservation of its own, occupying 5,000 acres of northern Round Valley. This division of the 20,000 acre territory left over 15,000 acres for white settlement.[3] Members of the Yuki tribe on the Nome Cult Farm (c.1858) Seeds of conflict

Despite the amount of land set aside for white settlement, the government had trouble stopping newcomers from settling all over the valley, including on the Nome Cult Farm and Mendocino Reservation.[5] As settlers moved into what was designated native territory, it became hard for the natives to survive. Those that lived on the Nome Cult Farm lived a life of hardship. In a type of indentured servitude, the natives raised their crops but reaped little of the actual benefits.[6] Natives were not protected but were subject to brutal treatment that included assaults, rape, murder, theft of their property, disease, and starvation.[7] Many white settlers who encroached on native territory engaged in kidnapping, stealing Native women and children and subjugating them to servitude or sexual abuse.[8] Natives at the Nome Cult Farm were overworked, and could even be killed if their work was not up to the standards of the reservation.[9] White settlers continued to exploit native land, with many families fencing in thousands of acres each.[10] They removed fences from the Nome Cult Farm and allowed their herds to graze on and through native land, some of which was already filled with crops.[11] The California Reservation System, which was subject to corruption, fraud and misuse of federal funds, provided little recourse.[12] As more settlers encroached on native land and resources, native food sources dried up on and around the reservations. Escalation

Since ranching methods at the time were not very advanced (barbed wire had not been invented), the settlers had trouble keeping their livestock on their land. Many tried to train their animals to stay in a certain area, but this was not always effective. Livestock often wandered, and the local terrain made matters worse. The territory was new, unfamiliar, and full of hazardous cliffs and predators, and many cattle and horses wandered off and died of natural causes.[13] However, the settlers blamed the natives for any animal that went missing, believing that they were the targets of “Indian Depredations”, holding public meetings to stir up animosity towards the natives.[11] In retaliation, they continued their assaults on native land and resources. With no police force at hand, the reservation was powerless to stop local theft of native property or abductions of native people.[7] Locals like Dryden Lacock even stated that settlers, including himself, were engaging in small raiding parties that killed “50-60 Indians a trip”.[6] Finally, on the brink of starvation and left with almost no options, the natives began to retaliate. In 1857 a Yuki shot a man named William Mantle while trying to cross the Eel River, and in 1858 a white man named John McDaniel was murdered.[6] Both had been famous for crimes committed against Native Americans, and reports from the U.S. Army claim that the natives were provoked in both instances.[14] State and federal involvement Seal of the natives of Round Valley

As tensions rose and natives began retaliating for crimes committed against them, the settlers petitioned the U.S. Army for aid. In 1859 the 6th U.S. infantry led by Major Edward Johnson was called to Round Valley.[6] Major Johnson sent Lieutenant Edward Dillon ahead with 17 men to scout the area and assess the situation. Lieutenant Dillon reported back that the settlers misrepresented the situation. Instead of settlers falling prey to natives, the settlers had in fact already killed hundreds of natives, whose hostile actions had been taken out of revenge or in an effort to survive. The problem, he reported, went all the way up the chain to Supt. Henley, who had been involved in organizing many of these raiding parties.[15] In fact, Supt. Henley was in league with Judge Serranus C. Hastings (a former Iowa Supreme Court Justice), who helped him design plans for the removal of natives from the local territory. As part of their plan, they launched raiding parties and held town-hall style public gatherings where settlers aired their grievances, leading to increased racial prejudice and hatred towards the natives.[16] Judge Hastings was also involved in real estate and livestock trade, and in one instance, the natives stole Judge Hastings’s $2,000 stallion in retaliation for the beatings they received at the hands of Judge Hastings’s ranch manager, H.L. Hall.[17] Hall had been involved in many brutal assaults on natives. He complained to Lieutenant Dillon that the natives were stealing white supplies. Dillon urged Hall to let him handle the situation, but Hall ignored the command and took his own men raiding. By March 23, 1859, Hall and his men had killed about 240 natives.[15] Dillon reported that Hall did not distinguish between guilty natives or innocent ones, and that his murders of even women and children were unprovoked.[18] In fact, later on when Hall asked for soldiers at his property to protect his livestock, the soldiers refused to do anything to help him, since they were only ordered to defend a native onslaught, and they did not believe what was happening resembled a native attack.[19] The natives faced a choice of either starving to death on the reservations that provided them with no food, or venturing off into the mountainous regions of Mendocino County and risk slaughter by local settlers.

Yurok Canoe Klamath River

Walter S. Jarboe and the Mendocino War

As the conflict reached a boiling point, Judge Hastings made the executive decision to fire Hall and move all of the remaining natives to the Mendocino Reservation, more to save his property than for the protection of the natives.[20] In June 1859 the “Citizens of Nome Cult Valley”, a group of 39 settlers from Round Valley, petitioned the governor of California, Governor John B. Weller, for help in protecting the settlers from native attacks.[21] This petition, promoted and pushed for by Henley and Judge Hastings, was one of more than a dozen letters and petitions that the white settlers of Round Valley sent to the governor requesting government funding for volunteers who sought to protect white property.[22] Within these petitions, the settlers stated their intentions to remove the natives from Mendocino through a “war of extermination”.[23] Weller turned to the Army for advice on the petition, seeking to know whether or not the allegations of the settlers were true, since the petitions alleged that over $40,000 in property damages had occurred and over 70 whites had been slain by natives. The petitions also requested that Walter S. Jarboe, a Mendocino County resident, be assigned captain of this group.[24] In 1858, Jarboe had been a leader on a raid in the Mendocino Reservation that killed over 60 natives.[15] Countering the petitioners’ claims, Major Johnson and Lieutenant Dillon issued reports telling a different story, claiming that only 2 whites and about 600 native had been killed in the past year.[15]

In the meantime, Hastings had grown tired of waiting, and created a new company anyway, without federal funding, with Jarboe as captain. The company was often referred to as the Eel River Rangers, and Hastings and Henley promised to provide the funding (they later went back on this promise, forcing the state to pay for Jarboe and his men).[25] From July 1859 to January 1860, Jarboe and his men ravaged native lands and massacred many natives. Claiming that the natives were guilty of theft and violence, Jarboe and his men engaged in an “ethnic cleansing genocide”.[26] Trying to justify his actions, Jarboe and his men used carcasses from plundered villages to try and give evidence for native thievery. It was a shoot-first, ask-questions-later approach that gave Jarboe and his men the powers of “judge, jury, and executioner”.[27] From July through the middle of August, Jarboe and his men had already killed at least 50 men, women, and children, prompting Major Johnson to write to Governor Weller. The governor wrote to Jarboe several times, sanctioning the raids, but asking Jarboe to leave out women and children and any innocent natives. Jarboe largely ignored these letters.[28] Through October Jarboe and his men continued to rampage through the countryside, killing and capturing natives. Those natives they captured were sent to the Mendocino Reservation and the Nome Cult Farm.[29] On February 18, 1860, Jarboe summarized his record, claiming that in 23 engagements, he and his men killed 283 warriors, captured 292 prisoners, while only sustaining 5 casualties themselves. The bill to the state for their five months of service was $11,143.43.[34] However, scholars now believe that the number of native casualties was grossly understated, as was the cost to the state. New California Governor John G. Downey now inherited the massive debts incurred by Jarboe and the settlers’ raids, debts that the state could not afford to pay.[31] Damage done to Yuki and other tribal cultures was incalculable.

The public reception of the conflict was mixed. A newly created Joint Special Committee on the Mendocino Indian War (also called the Select Committee on Indian Affairs) heard testimony from local settlers. The evidence was contradictory, with stories differing from each account, but some things remained consistent. Jarboe claimed that his actions were provoked by citing numbers of whites killed, but Dillon’s reports contradicted those statements. Dillon wrote to his superiors that white settlers were at fault for the entire conflict, and that the locals had funded the slaughter.[35] Many settlers claimed that the natives began the trouble by stealing cattle, while others testified that natives were allowed to eat the cattle and horses that strayed and died of natural causes.[34] Nevertheless, a general consensus emerged that the settlers wanted the natives off of their land and used any means necessary to force them out, including blaming natives for stealing livestock. The investigation concluded that no war had actually occurred in Mendocino County, since the slaughter of natives who offered little resistance and launched no counterattacks could not be considered a war. Rather, the conflict could be more correctly labeled as massacre, and later on historians began calling it a genocide. The committee also recommended some laws to help protect California Indians in the future, but none of them were ever put into place.[34]

Genocide

Between the time people settled in Mendocino County and the end of the ‘war’ (1856-1860), the population of Indians decreased by 80%.[36] The rest were relegated to the Mendocino Reservation and the Nome Cult Farm.[36] In the late 1880s, tensions left unresolved from this conflict would lead to the Round Valley War when, in defiance of federal authority, settlers once again began to take over areas of the reservation, ignoring federal policies and settling on Yuki lands.[37]

The natives were left facing major challenges. Working against them were hunger, unequal weapons, repeated and surprise attacks, their vulnerable position on reservations, and their lack of ability to speak on their own behalf. Jarboe’s forces also alienated some white settlers, slaughtering their livestock if they refused to give them food or the necessary supplies.[25] However, most of the damage was done to the natives and was especially deadly given the timing. With winter around the corner, the natives had spent months preparing and harvesting crops. Now, with raids, the men who farmed and hunted and the women who gathered and made the food were killed, and native stores of winter supplies were plundered and lost.[30] Jarboe and his men meanwhile continued their raiding and killing through the winter with the goal of removing the natives completely from Round Valley.[31] Some settlers also decided to assist in this cause, with ranchers leading attacks and raiding parties of their own. In one 22-day period, 40 ranchers killed at least 150 natives.[29] Finally, on January 3, 1860, Governor Weller disbanded Jarboe’s group.[32] The public swiftly opposed this decision, petitioning Governor Weller to reinstate the Eel River Rangers, but the protest was unsuccessful.[33]


What do the Justice Department Memos Say?
U.S. News & World Report

Dec 11, 2014 – Tribes Can Legalize Pot, Justice Department Decides … Indian tribes to grow and sell marijuana on reservation lands. … Read the memo: …

Cronology of Events in the Media Leading Up the Attack on Pomo Sovereignty and Self Determination

Pinoleville Tribe to Meet with Mendocino County. County …
http://www.originalpechanga.com/2011/04/pinoleville-tribe-to-meet-with.html
Apr 25, 2011 – Pinoleville Tribe to Meet with Mendocino County. County Should DENY any …. Disenrollment IS BLOODLESS Genocide. Disenrollment IS …
Pinoleville cannabis project to support tribal infrastructure
www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/growing-green-pinoleville-cannabis-proj…
Jul 16, 2015 – The Pinoleville Pomo Nation is providing readers of The Ukiah Daily Journal with a first-hand, exclusive look at the people, the processes and …
Tribe, Sheriff disagree on marijuana project – Ukiah Daily …
www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/tribe-sheriff-disagree-on-marijuana-proje…
Jun 4, 2015 – Mike Canales, president of the business board of the Pinoleville Pomo Nation affixes a … By Carole Brodsky, For the Ukiah Daily Journal.

Pinoleville Tribe’s ‘collective’ collaboration in development …

www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/pinoleville-tribes-collective-collaboration…
Jul 11, 2015 – The Pinoleville Pomo Nation is providing Ukiah Daily Journal readers … John Hardin, foreman for the Pinoleville Medical Cannabis Project, …

Pinoleville Pomo Nation hires security team at marijuana farm

Jul 17, 2015 – A cannabis plant. Photo from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikipedia The Ukiah Daily Journal continues its exclusive look at the marijuana …

Pinoleville asked to move pot plants – Ukiah Daily Journal

www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/pinoleville-asked-to-move-pot-plants
Jul 15, 2015 – Marijuana plants that could be seen from inside a fenced-off area from Highway 101 at the Pinoleville Pomo Nation were recently moved at the .

Deputies cut down Pinoleville pot plants in Ukiah

Ukiah Daily Journal1 day ago
By Justine Frederiksen, Ukiah Daily Journal … The plants were growing at 650 Pinoleville Drive, and while the deputies were cutting them …

“Time is Running Out: Ecology or Economics?” – David Suzuki

•October 31, 2015 • 2 Comments

“Time is Running Out: Ecology or Economics?” – David Suzuki

Redwood Cut

Redwood Wine finish

Willits Bypass Update: Two Mendocino Tribes Take Caltrans to Court Today For Knowingly Destroying Historic Preservation Sites

•October 31, 2015 • Leave a Comment

California Indian Tribes Take Caltrans to Court Today For Knowingly Destroying Historic Preservation Sites in Building of Willits Bypass

Kuksu Ceremony of the Pomo

Pomo Lodge, Kuksu Ceremony of the Pomo

October 30, 2015

A complaint was filed in the U.S. District Court in San Francisco today by two Northern California Indian Tribes, alleging that Caltrans, as well as various federal agencies, have intentionally destroyed known archaeological sites and failed to properly protect historical sites during construction of a highway bypass. The action was filed by the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians and the Round Valley Indian Tribes of California for violations of the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act. The Willits Bypass Project is a 6 mile long rerouting of Highway 101 through Little Lake Valley, near the city of Willits, in Mendocino County.

Caltrans logo

Phil Gregory, counsel for the Tribes, confirmed: “Caltrans must not be allowed to demolish cultural resources and sacred sites simply to build a highway bypass. Imagine Caltrans treating a church with such disrespect. This case challenges Caltrans’ ongoing failure to properly protect the Tribes’ ancestral sites in constructing the Bypass. Caltrans’ ground-disturbing activities are devastating ancestral Native American sacred and cultural sites.”

willits bypass

Pete McCloskey, a former Congressman and a partner at Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy stated: “It is outrageous for Caltrans to refuse to properly engage in consultation with the Tribes over their ancestral lands. These historic properties include archaeological and ethnographic resources, as well as human burial sites. Caltrans has yet to implement a process for identifying historic properties, cultural resources, and archaeological sites, which is incredible to our native California tribes.”

Michael Hunter, Chairman of the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians, declared: “Our Tribal elders felt it was essential to stand up to the aggressive and resistant manner Caltrans has treated the local Tribes. Caltrans refuses to protect our cultural heritage. On September 12, 2013, in the dead of night, Caltrans’s bulldozers destroyed one of our sacred sites in Little Lake Valley without tribal monitors notified or present. The National Advisory Council on Historic Preservation referenced the destruction of this ancient village as a ‘major violation of federal law.’ Caltrans refuses to protect ancestral archaeological sites and we ask other Indian nations and concerned citizens to join in demanding Caltrans protect our sacred sites and that government-to-government consultations with Tribes be conducted meaningfully and respectfully.”

James Russ, President of the Round Valley Tribal Council, said: “There was a complete lack of Tribal consultation, as well as no planning or preparedness to address Tribal concerns, prior to starting construction of this Project. Since the beginning, Caltrans has known the Project area has a moderate to high potential for buried archaeological remains. Because Caltrans continues to proceed in bad faith, such as isolating our Tribal monitors, we are forced to look to the Court to protect our religious, ancestral, and cultural properties that are being desecrated by Caltrans. Our main objection is not the Bypass project

Baechtel Ranch, Matomki Valley indians at Camp , Willits Valley 1858 Ca

Baechtel Ranch, Matomki Valley indians at Camp , Willits Valley 1858 Ca

in itself, but the reckless way that Caltrans conducts business with Tribes and Tribal communities. Our Tribe does not take lightly the disrespect to our sacred sites and our Tribal people.”

Prior to this action, the Tribes requested Caltrans issue a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to address the numerous historic sites that have been discovered in the Project area and the Mitigation parcels. Caltrans refused. The Tribes also contend Caltrans failed to exercise due diligence in its archaeological survey efforts for the Project, conducting only surface surveys in a wetlands area covered by grass. The Complaint asserts that, due to ongoing construction activities, sacred site identification occurs only after ground disturbing activities are completed. By way of relief, the Tribes request the Court immediately protect these areas, including by temporarily suspending construction activities on the Willits Bypass Project in order to address ongoing damage to sacred and cultural sites.

Pomo Village House

The Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians and the Round Valley Indian Tribes of California are represented by Joseph W. Cotchett, Philip L. Gregory, and Pete McCloskey of Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, along with co-counsel Sharon Duggan in Oakland.

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Pinoleville Pomo Sovereign Marijuana Farm Raided; Mendocino’s 150 Year Genocide of Pomo Peoples Continues

•September 24, 2015 • Leave a Comment

Pinoleville Pomo Sovereign Marijuana Farm Raided; & Why Mendocino Should LEAVE THE POMO ALONE

Genocide Mendocino

After numerous Attempts to Cooperate with the County and Sheriff’s Requests, the County and Sheriff Department Turn Their Backs on the Pomo People, Continuing a 150+ Year Tradition of Genocide and Oppression Against the Pomo Peoples by Mendocino County Government.

Pinoleville Pomo Raided

The Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office raided a medical marijuana growing operation on Indian land just north of Ukiah on Tuesday, disrupting a high-profile project that had garnered national attention and was hailed by tribal leaders as a new way to generate jobs and revenue for cash-strapped tribes.

Deputies eradicated some 400 pot plants from an outdoor location. At another location, they began dismantling a “highly sophisticated” chemical laboratory where honey oil — a sticky, concentrated pot product used to make edible medicine— was being manufactured under the auspices of the Pinoleville Pomo Nation, said Sheriff’s Capt. Greg Van Patten. More than 100 pounds of trimmed and drying marijuana also was found inside the laboratory building, a former car dealership on North State Street.

Tribal representatives who helped launch what is widely believed to be the first large-scale, tribal-operated medical pot operation in the state had contended they had a right to grow marijuana on the tribe’s 99-acre rancheria for the benefit of the estimated 250-member tribe.

They decried Tuesday’s raids, which were accompanied by court-issued warrants, on what they claim are legal operations.

“I think what they’re doing is not right,” said Nori Baldridge, the tribe’s director of economic development. “This is sovereign land and this is a sovereign nation,” she said.

 “We were shocked,” said Mike Canales, president of the tribe’s business board. He said he’s been in frequent contact with Sheriff Tom Allman and expected to be notified before there was any kind of raid. He also contends the sheriff does not have authority over the tribe and said he will be asking the county grand jury to investigate the issue.

Neither he nor Baldridge is a member of the tribe, but the two have been instrumental in creating the marijuana operation. Tribal Chairwoman Leona Williams could not immediately be reached for comment.

Sweatlodge Pomo Underground

For those of you not familiar with what sovereign means, in lay-mans terms it means the tribes have the federally protected right to decide, vote, and enforce their own set of tribal laws on their own tribal lands. These are lands which lay “outside” the reach of local jurisdictions, for instance the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Department. Essentially the Reservations and the tribal lands are recognized as “Sovereign Nations” with the right to decide their own destiny and the right to choose their own tribal laws. The Poinoleville Tribe has decided to partner up with the Very Successful Coilorado Based United Cannabis as well as Fox Barry Farms, two very powerful groups of financiers who are backed with millions of dollars as well as lobbyists and very smart, tactful and wise attorneys and lawyers. In other words, this is serious business which could bring the tribe a great deal of money: Except there is a catch!

Coyote

Mendocino County Sheriff Department Failure to Respect Sovereign Tribal Law:

Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman (the main authority and decision maker on marijuana in Mendocino County) has said the legality of such a large-scale proposal was questionable, even though the tribe is considered a sovereign nation.It seems the Mendocino County Sheriff who has a history with local tribal members and tribal government which goes back to the “Bear Lincoln Man Hunt Days” does not respect or honor for the sovereign rights of the Pinoleville Pomo Nation. On Wednesday Allman issued a written statement, disclosing that he had met with a tribal representative earlier in the day.

“Due to conflicting interpretations of state and local marijuana laws/ordinances relating to Tribal lands, no agreement was reached as to the legal operation of the marijuana cultivation,” the release states.

“It is the intent of the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office to fairly and equally enforce the law throughout Mendocino County. If a violation of state or local law is observed in Mendocino County, the appropriate law enforcement action will be taken,” he wrote, adding that he has the authority to enforce criminal laws on Indian lands.

pomo bark roundhouse

Could it be hot embers from “Old Feuds” Which are Keeping Sheriff Allman from Respecting Pomo Nation Sovereign Rights on the Pomo National Lands?

Buds and Humming Bird

What reason would the Sheriff have to keep these investors which have already invested Millions of Dollars into Tribal Casino’s and Tribal Gas Stations in our area from investing in the Good Will of the Pinoleville Tribe to produce Medicine for dying and sick patients, we believe it is nothing more than old embers which are still hot which the Sheriff Department still holds onto which is keeping the Sheriff from doing what is right!

Mendocino Counties Genocide Against the Pomo Indians:

No Mention of Mendocino County government and it’s current relationship with the Aboriginal Native Peoples of this area would be complete with out a mention of the “Mendocino Genocide” which occurred by the County of Mendocino and the State of California against these very same tribes the Sheriff Department is fighting and still oppressing today:

Mendocino’s Genocide: Hidden History of Willits, Little Lake Valley

pomo ceremonial necklace

~According to the Press Democrat _-

Mendocino County sheriff’s deputies raid tribe’s pot operation near Ukiah

Why Can’t the Mendocino County Sheriff Department be Trusted by the Community?

THE “OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE” From the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office:

Several months ago the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office began receiving information about a marijuana cultivation operation being established by the Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribe in Ukiah, California.

Since that time personnel from the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office had numerous contacts with representatives from the tribe concerning why the operation was being established.

During those contacts it was determined the operation was utilizing open land located at 650 Pinoleville Road and a building at 2150 North State Street both being locations in Ukiah, California.

Several aerial over-flights of 650 Pinoleville Road were conducted within the last two months showing approximately 400 growing marijuana plants at that location.

On 09-18-2015 Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office Deputies were called to 2150 North State Street due to the activation of a burglary alarm.

Upon arrival Deputies contacted several individuals who were transporting cut marijuana plants from 650 Pinoleville Road to the building.  These individuals identified themselves as being employed by the Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribe.

On 09-22-2015 the County of Mendocino Marijuana Eradication Team obtained search warrants for 650 Pinoleville Road and 2150 North State Street.

Each search warrant was subsequently served and 382 growing marijuana plants were eradicated from 650 Pinoleville Road.  Investigators noticed several marijuana plants had already been harvested from the location.

During the search of the building at 2150 North State Street a sophisticated honey oil chemical extraction laboratory was discovered in addition to over 100 pounds of trimmed/processed marijuana.

No individuals were present at both locations when the search warrants were served and investigations are on-going at this time.

In 1953 Public Law 280 mandated a substantial transfer of jurisdiction from the federal government to the state level in California as to situations occurring on Indian Country.

As a result, The Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office is mandated to assume jurisdiction on Indian Country located in the unincorporated areas of Mendocino County and to enforce California state laws including those listed in the crime/incident section of this press release.

TRUE Mendocino County History

The TRUTH Shall Prevail In The End!

Genocide

Pomo Indians as

Pomo Indians as “Herded Up” onto Mendocino County Reservation in the 1850’s. Notice there are only women and children, ;local male indians were called “bucks” by maurading bands of genocidists and were sytematically killed. Starting In the 1850’s POMO as well as many other local tribes which were exterminated by the genocide were subjected to a war of extermination and genocide throughout Mendocino County Theses cold hearted acts of Genocide against Elderly, Men Women and even babies became known as the “Mendocino Wars” and were documented by Congressional Inquiry.

Prior to the “Manifest Destiny” in which whites thought it was their “God Given Right” to conquer and destroy the “Pagan ways and Peoples of the New World” as well as steal their land in the name of “God”, Mendocino County had one of the largest populations of Native American peoples in the State. These tribes spent the winters in the inland Valley’s such as Ukiah, Willits and Laytonville, and camped on the coast during the spring and summer where they collected seafood and grasses as well as cultivated grains by means of burning valley fields and plating pinole( a mix of native seeds and grains) which were collected the year before using large baskets which had the seeds “beat into the basket”

Pomo Seed Gatherer

. The “Mendocino War”,  just a small part of the “Mendocino Genocide”, was a violent act of Mendocino County and California State Sponsored genocide perpetuated from July 1859 to January 18, 1860, against the local native people including the Cahto, Coastal Yuki, Wailaki, Yuki, Huchnom (now extinct) as well as other local Mendocino County tribes which also were eliminated by these very same acts of  genocide. The Genocide in Mendocino County Ca was committed  by groups of white men from Willits and Ukiah mounted on horses and carrying firearms. The Eel River Rangers as they were called, were  paid and sponsored by the State of California and under the directions of local “pioneers”. This genocide, aimed against a  peaceful local community of Hunter, Gatherer Native Americans which had inhabited Mendocino County Ca for thousands of years was caused by settler intrusion onto native lands in the name of “Manifest Destiny”. These intrusions resulted in the deaths of thousands of local natives including the elderly, men women and even babies. In 1859, a band of locally sponsored “RANGERS” , (yes this is where the term ranger comes from), led by Walter S. Jarboe, organized by Judge Serranus C Hastings called the Eel River Rangers raided the countryside in an effort to kill and forcibly remove natives from their Native Homes where they had lived for thousands of years and move them onto the Mendocino Reservation where today’s Fort Bragg stands as well as Nome Cult Farm, near Covelo, now called Round Valley Reservation. The settlers of Mendocino County wanted the Aboriginal Native Mendocino Lands and had absolutely no problem with committing acts of murder, genocide including the wholesale slaughter of entire Mendocino Indian villages in order to steal the land.

By the time the Eel River Rangers were disbanded in 1860, by his own estimates,  Jarboe and his men had killed 283 warriors, captured 292, and had admitted to killing countless women and children in Mendocino County. The Rangers themselves only suffered 5 casualties in the 23 engagements, showing the extent of the slaughter. Many people of the time as well as many historians today claim the number of Native Mendocino County Indians exterminated by the Eel River Rangers to be much higher, reaching into the many thousands. The Villages of the Indians were usually attacked at dawn while the Indians were sleeping and most villagers including all the men would be slaughtered, many elderly, women and children would be slaughtered as well, the women and children who survived were forcibly kidnapped and “driven” by whip to the nearest reservations. where they faced more brutality, including sexual assaults, kidnapping as well as starvation at what has became known as California’s first Concentration Camps, today’s “reservations”.

Even when forced onto the reservation in Covelo, local Native Peoples were forced into slavery and faced starvation. Women and Children were constantly raped and sexually assaulted by pioneer men of Mendocino County who would “raid” the reservation.. Children were also kidnapped from Round Valley reservation,, tied onto horses and “packed” or “driven” to the Sacramento Valley where they were sold as sexual concubines to wealthy white ranchers or sold into slavery on one of the many farms in the Sacramento Valley.

Kidnapping indians mendocino

California Paid for the Mendocino County Genocide;

The bill to the state for the rangers’ services amounted to $11,143.43. Scholars, however, claim that the damage to the area and natives in particular was even higher than reported, especially given the vast number of raiding parties formed outside of the Eel River Rangers. Frustrated with the inadequacy of federal protection, settlers formed their own raiding parties against the natives, joining Jarboe in his mission to rid Round Valley of its native population. Those that survived were moved to the Nome Cult Farm, where they experienced hardships typical of the reservation system of the day. After the conflict, contemporaries claimed that the conflict was more of a slaughter than a war, and later historians have labeled it a genocide.

Pomo Village House

Pomo Linguistic Map

Henry Raschen Interior Of A Pomo Dwelling 1883

Henry Raschen Interior Of A Pomo Dwelling 1883

Pomo house. Donated by: Zella Bleyhl

Pomo Indians Today

Pomo Indians Today

California’s First Tribally Sponsored “Medical Marijuana Medicinal Farm” has began preparing for planting on their Sovereign Tribal Lands North of Ukiah on the Pinoleville Pomo Nation’s rancheria, along Highway 101. Where once only Mono-crops of chemical and pesticide grown grapes were grown there is now a new organic crop in the neighborhood, Medical Marijuana!

Dec. 11, 2014 Report from US News and World Report Revealing tribes can legally grow and sell medical marijuana.

Dec. 11, 2014 Report from US News and World Report Revealing tribes can legally grow and sell medical marijuana.

Mendocino Counties Genocide Against the Pomo Indians:

No Mention of Mendocino County government and it’s current relationship with the Aboriginal Native Peoples of this area would be complete with out a mention of the “Mendocino Genocide” which occurred by the County of Mendocino and the State of California against these very same tribes the Sheriff Department is fighting and still oppressing today:

Mendocino’s Genocide: Hidden History of Willits, Little Lake Valley

Genocide

The Willits – Little Lake Valley was called Mitomkai meaning big valley, mato = big + kai valley, by the Mitomkai Pomo Indian Tribelets which lived and claimed the Little Lake Valley as their home for thousands of years. The heavily populated Valley supported a population of over 4,000 in ancient times, the Mitomkai Pomo indians lived on the high ground around the Valley. The largest of the Villages, called “mato” or “Big” was situated at the site of present day Willits, on the top of the Hill between Coast Street and Mill Street, there is still the large oak tree which is judged to be around 300 years old standing on this hill today. The Mitomkai Pomo practiced a hunter gatherer life dominated by collection of prairie seeds from the Valley which the Indians cultivated by burning the fields and Meadows in spring and spreading the seeds which were gathered in the fall the year before.

Pomo Woman Gathering Pinole Seeds with Baskets.

The seeds were gathered as they ripened using a long cylindrical basket and a “beating basket” which was used to thresh the seeds into the larger basket. Acorns were gathered in the Fall and stored in winter granaries which kept the acorns fresh and out of the reach of pests.

Acorn Granary

Salmon were harvested in the fall around November and December as Chinook King Salmon and Coho Salmon as well as trout and Steelhead made their annual migrations. The Mitomkai Pomo Territory Extended to the Coast where the Mitomkai Pomo claimed a Village at Big River in Mendocino called Buldam. The Ancient Indian trail to the Coast followed the modern day Willits – Fortbragg Road except the Indian Trails were on the ridgetops. At the Mouth of Big River, at a Village called Buldam by the Mitomkai Pomo Indians, the Indians collected seaweeds, Mussels and Abalone as well as fished the many different Species of Freshwater Fish including Salmon and Steelhead from Big River. Fish, mollusks including mussels and abalone as well as seaweed were dried on the ridge tops above the fog bank on the coast where they kept their villages safe from passing boats canoes and kayaks. The Indians used all sorts of Canoes up and down the California Coast from the Chumash in Santa Barbara to the Yurok of Humboldt County. The Ocean was used as a highway for trade. Many trading spots were found along the Mendocino Coast, from Big River to Mussel Rock. Many tribes from all over the California Coast would gather at Mussel Rock North of Ten Mile River. There on the large hill overlooking Mussel Rock and the Pacific Ocean was a Village called Lilem where high on the overlooking hill was a Subterranean Sweat house Capable of holding 200 people or more for religious ceremony. The many shellmounds as well as midden piles along the Mendocino Coast are testament to the ancient land claims to ancient fishing grounds.

Indian Sweathouse, Big River Mendocino County Ca

Little Lake, Mitomkai Valley hosted large herds of deer and elk as well as large populations of Grizzly Bear and Mountain Lions before the coming of foreign settlers. Many of the Mitomkai Pomo people were rounded up on the Coast as they made their yearly trips to the coast sometime around the year 1855. In 1855 an exploration party from the Bureau of Indian Affairs visited the area looking for a site on which to establish a reservation and, in the spring of 1856, the Mendocino Indian Reservation was established at Noyo.[1] In the summer of 1857, First Lieutenant Horatio G. Gibson, then serving at the Presidio of San Francisco, was ordered to take Company M, 3rd Regiment of Artillery to establish a military post one and one-half miles north of the Noyo River on the Mendocino Indian Reservation. The official date of the establishment of Fort Bragg was June 11, 1857. Its purpose was to maintain order on the reservation, and protect the Indians and reservation lands from settlers. Many Mitomakai Pomo People would never return from their yearly fishing trip to the coast. Instead they were “rounded up” like cattle by cowboys on horses and marched to Fort Bragg, then the headquarters of the Mendocino Indian Reservation. At the reservation the indians faced starvation, disease as well as the kidknapping and rape of their women and children. Other groups which ran away from the Reservation were hunted down by groups and Militias of State Sanctioned and State Paid “Volunteers” such as William Jarboes “Eel River Rangers”.

Mendocino Indian Reservation

As more settlers encroached on Little Lake Valley and Mendocino County, indian hunting grounds were ruined by the hooves of Settlers Cattle which ate the Indians grasses and clovers. Settlers killed the Elk and Deer which had been so carefully manged for millennia. Starving Displaced indians soon turned to killing livestock and cattle to survive. White Settlers retaliated by raiding indian villages during the early morning hours and killing every man woman and child to be found. Soon, every loss of animal was blamed on the indians despite the fact the County hosted a very large population of Mountain Lions and Grizzly Bears who have been found to be the main culprits behind the missing game. In the meantime the Mitomkai Pomo indians were blamed, the Mitomkai were rounded up or killed. Many Children were sold to Ranchers in the Sacramento Valley where they fetched up to a $100 for a girl.

Kidnapping indians mendocino

Genocide of the Mitomkai and Mendocino Indian Tribes “The Mendocino War” Round Valley, located in northeastern Mendocino County in Northern California, was home to various Native American tribes. The most populous of these local tribes were the Yuki, whose territory was roughly 1,100 square miles.[1] The Yuki were not one political people; rather, they were several autonomous groups that shared both language and culture, with each community having its own leadership.[2] In 1853, California started its Indian Reservation System, which was headed by Thomas J. Henley (Superintendent of Indian Affairs), and by 1854 Round Valley was discovered by white settlers.[3] Frank Asbill, the first white man to see the territory, estimated that there were about 20,000 natives in the area at the time. Scholars now believe this number is a little high, but by 1856, there were 12,000 Native Americans in Round Valley.[4] Although a few families moved into native territory, many of the settlers were hunters, fugitives, drifters, and the like. In general, they were people who lived off of the land, who traveled to the area for its resources.[3] In the same year, Thomas Henley sent Simmon Pena Storms to start the Nome Cult Farm.[3] Originally meant to be a resting point for natives and people traveling to the Mendocino Reservation, the Nome Cult Farm grew to become a reservation of its own, occupying 5,000 acres of northern Round Valley. This division of the 20,000 acre territory left over 15,000 acres for white settlement.[3] Members of the Yuki tribe on the Nome Cult Farm (c.1858) Seeds of conflict

Despite the amount of land set aside for white settlement, the government had trouble stopping newcomers from settling all over the valley, including on the Nome Cult Farm and Mendocino Reservation.[5] As settlers moved into what was designated native territory, it became hard for the natives to survive. Those that lived on the Nome Cult Farm lived a life of hardship. In a type of indentured servitude, the natives raised their crops but reaped little of the actual benefits.[6] Natives were not protected but were subject to brutal treatment that included assaults, rape, murder, theft of their property, disease, and starvation.[7] Many white settlers who encroached on native territory engaged in kidnapping, stealing Native women and children and subjugating them to servitude or sexual abuse.[8] Natives at the Nome Cult Farm were overworked, and could even be killed if their work was not up to the standards of the reservation.[9] White settlers continued to exploit native land, with many families fencing in thousands of acres each.[10] They removed fences from the Nome Cult Farm and allowed their herds to graze on and through native land, some of which was already filled with crops.[11] The California Reservation System, which was subject to corruption, fraud and misuse of federal funds, provided little recourse.[12] As more settlers encroached on native land and resources, native food sources dried up on and around the reservations. Escalation

Since ranching methods at the time were not very advanced (barbed wire had not been invented), the settlers had trouble keeping their livestock on their land. Many tried to train their animals to stay in a certain area, but this was not always effective. Livestock often wandered, and the local terrain made matters worse. The territory was new, unfamiliar, and full of hazardous cliffs and predators, and many cattle and horses wandered off and died of natural causes.[13] However, the settlers blamed the natives for any animal that went missing, believing that they were the targets of “Indian Depredations”, holding public meetings to stir up animosity towards the natives.[11] In retaliation, they continued their assaults on native land and resources. With no police force at hand, the reservation was powerless to stop local theft of native property or abductions of native people.[7] Locals like Dryden Lacock even stated that settlers, including himself, were engaging in small raiding parties that killed “50-60 Indians a trip”.[6] Finally, on the brink of starvation and left with almost no options, the natives began to retaliate. In 1857 a Yuki shot a man named William Mantle while trying to cross the Eel River, and in 1858 a white man named John McDaniel was murdered.[6] Both had been famous for crimes committed against Native Americans, and reports from the U.S. Army claim that the natives were provoked in both instances.[14] State and federal involvement Seal of the natives of Round Valley

As tensions rose and natives began retaliating for crimes committed against them, the settlers petitioned the U.S. Army for aid. In 1859 the 6th U.S. infantry led by Major Edward Johnson was called to Round Valley.[6] Major Johnson sent Lieutenant Edward Dillon ahead with 17 men to scout the area and assess the situation. Lieutenant Dillon reported back that the settlers misrepresented the situation. Instead of settlers falling prey to natives, the settlers had in fact already killed hundreds of natives, whose hostile actions had been taken out of revenge or in an effort to survive. The problem, he reported, went all the way up the chain to Supt. Henley, who had been involved in organizing many of these raiding parties.[15] In fact, Supt. Henley was in league with Judge Serranus C. Hastings (a former Iowa Supreme Court Justice), who helped him design plans for the removal of natives from the local territory. As part of their plan, they launched raiding parties and held town-hall style public gatherings where settlers aired their grievances, leading to increased racial prejudice and hatred towards the natives.[16] Judge Hastings was also involved in real estate and livestock trade, and in one instance, the natives stole Judge Hastings’s $2,000 stallion in retaliation for the beatings they received at the hands of Judge Hastings’s ranch manager, H.L. Hall.[17] Hall had been involved in many brutal assaults on natives. He complained to Lieutenant Dillon that the natives were stealing white supplies. Dillon urged Hall to let him handle the situation, but Hall ignored the command and took his own men raiding. By March 23, 1859, Hall and his men had killed about 240 natives.[15] Dillon reported that Hall did not distinguish between guilty natives or innocent ones, and that his murders of even women and children were unprovoked.[18] In fact, later on when Hall asked for soldiers at his property to protect his livestock, the soldiers refused to do anything to help him, since they were only ordered to defend a native onslaught, and they did not believe what was happening resembled a native attack.[19] The natives faced a choice of either starving to death on the reservations that provided them with no food, or venturing off into the mountainous regions of Mendocino County and risk slaughter by local settlers.

Yurok Canoe Klamath River

Walter S. Jarboe and the Mendocino War

As the conflict reached a boiling point, Judge Hastings made the executive decision to fire Hall and move all of the remaining natives to the Mendocino Reservation, more to save his property than for the protection of the natives.[20] In June 1859 the “Citizens of Nome Cult Valley”, a group of 39 settlers from Round Valley, petitioned the governor of California, Governor John B. Weller, for help in protecting the settlers from native attacks.[21] This petition, promoted and pushed for by Henley and Judge Hastings, was one of more than a dozen letters and petitions that the white settlers of Round Valley sent to the governor requesting government funding for volunteers who sought to protect white property.[22] Within these petitions, the settlers stated their intentions to remove the natives from Mendocino through a “war of extermination”.[23] Weller turned to the Army for advice on the petition, seeking to know whether or not the allegations of the settlers were true, since the petitions alleged that over $40,000 in property damages had occurred and over 70 whites had been slain by natives. The petitions also requested that Walter S. Jarboe, a Mendocino County resident, be assigned captain of this group.[24] In 1858, Jarboe had been a leader on a raid in the Mendocino Reservation that killed over 60 natives.[15] Countering the petitioners’ claims, Major Johnson and Lieutenant Dillon issued reports telling a different story, claiming that only 2 whites and about 600 native had been killed in the past year.[15]

In the meantime, Hastings had grown tired of waiting, and created a new company anyway, without federal funding, with Jarboe as captain. The company was often referred to as the Eel River Rangers, and Hastings and Henley promised to provide the funding (they later went back on this promise, forcing the state to pay for Jarboe and his men).[25] From July 1859 to January 1860, Jarboe and his men ravaged native lands and massacred many natives. Claiming that the natives were guilty of theft and violence, Jarboe and his men engaged in an “ethnic cleansing genocide”.[26] Trying to justify his actions, Jarboe and his men used carcasses from plundered villages to try and give evidence for native thievery. It was a shoot-first, ask-questions-later approach that gave Jarboe and his men the powers of “judge, jury, and executioner”.[27] From July through the middle of August, Jarboe and his men had already killed at least 50 men, women, and children, prompting Major Johnson to write to Governor Weller. The governor wrote to Jarboe several times, sanctioning the raids, but asking Jarboe to leave out women and children and any innocent natives. Jarboe largely ignored these letters.[28] Through October Jarboe and his men continued to rampage through the countryside, killing and capturing natives. Those natives they captured were sent to the Mendocino Reservation and the Nome Cult Farm.[29] On February 18, 1860, Jarboe summarized his record, claiming that in 23 engagements, he and his men killed 283 warriors, captured 292 prisoners, while only sustaining 5 casualties themselves. The bill to the state for their five months of service was $11,143.43.[34] However, scholars now believe that the number of native casualties was grossly understated, as was the cost to the state. New California Governor John G. Downey now inherited the massive debts incurred by Jarboe and the settlers’ raids, debts that the state could not afford to pay.[31] Damage done to Yuki and other tribal cultures was incalculable.

The public reception of the conflict was mixed. A newly created Joint Special Committee on the Mendocino Indian War (also called the Select Committee on Indian Affairs) heard testimony from local settlers. The evidence was contradictory, with stories differing from each account, but some things remained consistent. Jarboe claimed that his actions were provoked by citing numbers of whites killed, but Dillon’s reports contradicted those statements. Dillon wrote to his superiors that white settlers were at fault for the entire conflict, and that the locals had funded the slaughter.[35] Many settlers claimed that the natives began the trouble by stealing cattle, while others testified that natives were allowed to eat the cattle and horses that strayed and died of natural causes.[34] Nevertheless, a general consensus emerged that the settlers wanted the natives off of their land and used any means necessary to force them out, including blaming natives for stealing livestock. The investigation concluded that no war had actually occurred in Mendocino County, since the slaughter of natives who offered little resistance and launched no counterattacks could not be considered a war. Rather, the conflict could be more correctly labeled as massacre, and later on historians began calling it a genocide. The committee also recommended some laws to help protect California Indians in the future, but none of them were ever put into place.[34]

Genocide

Between the time people settled in Mendocino County and the end of the ‘war’ (1856-1860), the population of Indians decreased by 80%.[36] The rest were relegated to the Mendocino Reservation and the Nome Cult Farm.[36] In the late 1880s, tensions left unresolved from this conflict would lead to the Round Valley War when, in defiance of federal authority, settlers once again began to take over areas of the reservation, ignoring federal policies and settling on Yuki lands.[37]

The natives were left facing major challenges. Working against them were hunger, unequal weapons, repeated and surprise attacks, their vulnerable position on reservations, and their lack of ability to speak on their own behalf. Jarboe’s forces also alienated some white settlers, slaughtering their livestock if they refused to give them food or the necessary supplies.[25] However, most of the damage was done to the natives and was especially deadly given the timing. With winter around the corner, the natives had spent months preparing and harvesting crops. Now, with raids, the men who farmed and hunted and the women who gathered and made the food were killed, and native stores of winter supplies were plundered and lost.[30] Jarboe and his men meanwhile continued their raiding and killing through the winter with the goal of removing the natives completely from Round Valley.[31] Some settlers also decided to assist in this cause, with ranchers leading attacks and raiding parties of their own. In one 22-day period, 40 ranchers killed at least 150 natives.[29] Finally, on January 3, 1860, Governor Weller disbanded Jarboe’s group.[32] The public swiftly opposed this decision, petitioning Governor Weller to reinstate the Eel River Rangers, but the protest was unsuccessful.[33]


What do the Justice Department Memos Say?
U.S. News & World Report

Dec 11, 2014 – Tribes Can Legalize Pot, Justice Department Decides … Indian tribes to grow and sell marijuana on reservation lands. … Read the memo: …

Cronology of  Events in the Media Leading Up the Attack on Pomo Sovereignty and Self Determination

Pinoleville Tribe to Meet with Mendocino County. County …
http://www.originalpechanga.com/2011/04/pinoleville-tribe-to-meet-with.html
Apr 25, 2011 – Pinoleville Tribe to Meet with Mendocino County. County Should DENY any …. Disenrollment IS BLOODLESS Genocide. Disenrollment IS …
Pinoleville cannabis project to support tribal infrastructure
www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/growing-green-pinoleville-cannabis-proj…
Jul 16, 2015 – The Pinoleville Pomo Nation is providing readers of The Ukiah Daily Journal with a first-hand, exclusive look at the people, the processes and …
Tribe, Sheriff disagree on marijuana project – Ukiah Daily …
www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/tribe-sheriff-disagree-on-marijuana-proje…
Jun 4, 2015 – Mike Canales, president of the business board of the Pinoleville Pomo Nation affixes a … By Carole Brodsky, For the Ukiah Daily Journal.

Pinoleville Tribe’s ‘collective’ collaboration in development …

www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/pinoleville-tribes-collective-collaboration…
Jul 11, 2015 – The Pinoleville Pomo Nation is providing Ukiah Daily Journal readers … John Hardin, foreman for the Pinoleville Medical Cannabis Project, …

Pinoleville Pomo Nation hires security team at marijuana farm

Jul 17, 2015 – A cannabis plant. Photo from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikipedia The Ukiah Daily Journal continues its exclusive look at the marijuana …

Pinoleville asked to move pot plants – Ukiah Daily Journal

www.ukiahdailyjournal.com/…/pinoleville-asked-to-move-pot-plants
Jul 15, 2015 – Marijuana plants that could be seen from inside a fenced-off area from Highway 101 at the Pinoleville Pomo Nation were recently moved at the .

Deputies cut down Pinoleville pot plants in Ukiah

Ukiah Daily Journal1 day ago
By Justine Frederiksen, Ukiah Daily Journal … The plants were growing at 650 Pinoleville Drive, and while the deputies were cutting them …

CLUES SOUGHT in Disappearance & Murder of Rachel Sloan of Laytonville: DNA Identifies Burned Remains Found in Refrigerator as Missing Laytonville Woman Rachel Sloan:

•September 22, 2015 • Leave a Comment

CLUES SOUGHT in Disappearance & Murder of Rachel Sloan of Laytonville:

DNA Identifies Burned Remains Found in Refrigerator as 25 yo Rachel Sloan of Laytonville.

Rachel Sloan Laytonville Ca

Victim photo released in hopes of generating leads in cold case
Burned human remains identified two years later as 25 yo Rachel Sloan of Laytonville Ca.

The Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office is hoping someone will contact investigators with information regarding the murder of a local tribal member.

Investigators said DNA samples from the family of 25-year-old Rachel Audrey Sloan were matched to remains found back in 2013. They said that match was made on September 1st of this year.

crime scene Rachel Sloan Covelo Road

On May 16, 2013, deputies were called to a secluded area on Highway 162 north of Willits for the report of burned human remains discarded inside a refrigerator.
Deputies located what they believed to be a charm bracelet or necklace with the remains.

In May 2015, deputies said family members of Rachel Sloan reported her missing from Laytonville. They said they hadn’t seen her since August 2012.

The death of Rachel Sloan is being treated as a homicide investigation.

Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office tip line at 707-234-2100.

HAPPY HARVEST! Fires and Drought INCREASE 2015 California Marijuana Prices

•September 22, 2015 • 1 Comment

Severe Fires and Severe Drought have pushed the Prices Up for California’s nearly 100,000+ Cannabis Farmers in 2015. Prospects Look  Good for California’s Cannabis Farmers who Survived the Drought and Wildfires.

A severe 2015 drought in California which put pressure on many of California’s Cannabis farmers to reduce crop size  or reduce the amount of water plants received combined with nearly 1,000,000 acres of California Cannabis growing region going up in flames in a series of Wildfires spurred by logging, climate change and four years of drought has seen a dramatic 50% price increase for the State Medical Cannabis Farmers.

With this summer’s  Lake County Fires including the Jerusalem, Rocky and the recent Valley fire scorching across Lake County combined with hundreds of other fires across the State including  Humboldt, Trinity and Buute fires, a significant amount of prime cannabis growing regions have been put out of commission for the time being with entire gardens being left as charred remains.

Farmers whose crops were close to these fires are also at loss due to “smokey smelling buds” which like grapes, the cannabis can absorb the smokey smell of the wild fire.  Wineries report similar losses if there is a significant amount of wild fire smoke near the wine grape fields. A large amount of the Cannabis grown in the Emerald Triangle region is sold to farmers collectives in the Bay Area and Southern California where it is tested and prepared for resale to Medical Cannabis Patients suffering from a host of ailments. Cannabis from Northern California’s “Emerald Triangle Region” is well sought after due to it;’s well known quality, distinct flavors due to the climate as well as the technology and growing techniques exclusive to the area and developed by local Emerald Triangle Growers which goes back nearly 5 decades to the 1960’s when “back to the landers” began cultivating the rare Heirloom strains so sought after in by todays “Wholefoods Awareness” shoppers.  Cannabis in the Emerald Triangle is replacing the destruction of the Redwood Ecosystem by Global Timber Corporations,  Cannabis Production provides Cottage Industry jobs at home for many folks inside the Emerald Triangle and Northern California, indeed the communities are busy with people fueling up, getting propane, buying supplies at the local Hardware stores and going shopping for hungry trimmers. It’s the beginning of Harvest 2015 in the Emerald Triangle and throughout Northern California

Medical Marijuana Dispensaries in the Bay Area and beyond are already well aware of the current market increase and lack of buds compared to other years. The 2015 busts in the Island Mountain, Mendocino and Humboldt region also proved to increase prices for farmers as well. Many of the springs “light dep crops” were busted this year in a political move where local sheriffs would later claim plants in 5 gallon buckets were using 6 gallons per day claiming farmers were the reason rivers were running dry ignoring the fact that 50% of the Eel River is stolen to the Russian River by PG&E via Van Arsdale Lake Mendocino….

Prices for quality organic outdoor have not been better for 4 or 5 years and there seems to be a search on for “Quality Bud” according to the local community in the Emerald Triangle. Good Luck Farmers and Happy Harvest 2015

Black Garlic x Sour Diesel

You’re It – Alan Watts

•September 21, 2015 • Leave a Comment

alan watts

  • Alan Watts
    Philosopher
  • Alan Wilson Watts was a British-born American philosopher, writer, and speaker, best known as an interpreter and populariser of Eastern philosophy for a Western audience. Wikipedia
  • Born: January 6, 1915, Chislehurst, London, United Kingdom
  • Died: November 16, 1973, Mount Tamalpais, San Francisco, CA
  • Schools of thought: Zen, Catholicism, Pantheism, Hinduism, Christianity, Taoism, Religious naturalism
  • Quotes
    The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance.
    I have realized that the past and future are real illusions, that they exist in the present, which is what there is and all there is.
    Trying to define yourself is like trying to bite your own teeth.
 
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